High Blood Mercury Increases Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Risk

A new study reports that elevated levels of blood mercury are associated with an increased prevalence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC).The most common human malignancy, NMSC has continued to rise in incidence in recent years. A better understanding of risk factors, including blood mercury levels, is needed in order to aid in prevention and improve patient outcomes. While a number of epidemiological studies have investigated the link between cancer risk and occupational exposure to mercury, litt...
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Alcohol Use in Cancer Survivors With Nina Sanford, MD

Alcohol use, particularly at high levels, is known to be both a risk factor for cancer and a contributor to poor oncologic outcomes. However, few guidelines are in place for health care providers to counsel their patients regarding alcohol consumption both during and after treatment. In a study now published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a team of researchers led by Nina Sanford, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas Southwestern ...
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Baseline PSA Screening and Long-Term Prostate Cancer Risk

​Baseline levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at age 55 to 60 are correlated with men's long-term risk of developing clinically significant prostate cancer, according to a secondary analysis of long-term follow-up results from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.Once broadly accepted as a tool for the early detection of prostate cancer, PSA screening has become controversial in recent years due to issues of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of slow-growi...
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Genital Powder and Ovarian Cancer Risk: No Significant Link

​In recent years, a number of lawsuits have highlighted concerns regarding a possible link between ovarian cancer risk and the use of talc-containing cosmetic powders in the genital area. However, a large pooled analysis now published in JAMA reports no statistically significant association between genital powder use and ovarian cancer.The potential connection between genital powder use and ovarian cancer risk was first investigated because of the relationship between talcum powder and asbestos,...
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MRI Reduces Interval Breast Cancers in Dense Breasts

A randomized clinical trial reports that for women with extremely dense breasts, supplemental screening with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reduce the incidence of interval breast cancers­­, those detected within 12 months of a mammography in which findings are considered normal.Extremely dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer, but it also increases the chances that cancer will be missed on a mammogram. While federal law requires the reporting of breast density in mam...
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