Pediatric Brain Tumors: Cognitive Effects in Adulthood

Children with central nervous system (CNS) tumors have good prognoses; 75% will live at least five years after diagnosis. Unfortunately, a recent study has shown that these survivors experience neuropsychological problems and lower socioeconomic status later in life compared with their healthy peers.For this study, published in Cancer, the researchers analyzed data on 181 adult survivors of pediatric low-grade gliomas from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and compared them with a group of 105...
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Tozuleristide Enables Fluorescence-Guided Surgery in Glioma

​For patients with gliomas, tumors that begin in the glial cells of the brain and spinal cord, fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can improve the extent of surgical resection by enabling neurosurgeons to better see the margins of the malignancies that they are trying to remove. A recent study has revealed that when used with a new, high-sensitivity near-infrared camera, tozuleristide (BLZ-100) provides effective imaging for FGS in adults with newly diagnosed or recurrent gliomas.The high-sensitiv...
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Faulty DNA Repair in Medulloblastomas and High-Grade Gliomas

Researchers have found that medulloblastomas and high-grade gliomas, two types of brain tumors, often exhibit frequent, complex rearrangements of the genome as a result of malfunctioning DNA repair.Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) investigated the cause of chromothripsis, one of two "catastrophic genomic events" that cause genomic instability and are implicated in the development of cancer. In chromothripsis, tens to hundreds of clustered D...
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Bigger Brain, Bigger Risk of Brain Cancer

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found that larger brain size, as measured by intracranial volume, puts individuals at increased risk of glioma, the most common type of primary brain tumor.Gliomas, which occur in the brain and spinal cord, originate in glial stem cells. Their cause is unknown. Epidemiological studies have identified several risk factors, including age (gliomas are most commonly seen in adults), male sex, ionizing radiation, white...
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