In Breast Cancer, Men Have Increased Mortality

Even after adjustment for undertreatment and differing clinical characteristics, men with breast cancer have higher mortality rates than women, report the authors of a nationwide cohort study. The researchers, who are from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, analyzed data obtained from the National Cancer Database on 1,816,733 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2004 and December 2014. The patient population included 16,025 men and 1,800,708 women. The...
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Fighting Breast Cancer: Around Half a Million Lives Saved

​From 1975 to 1990, mortality rates for US women with breast cancer increased by 0.4% per year. Since then, breast cancer mortality rates have declined between 1.8% and 3.4% per year, resulting in between 384,000 and 614,500 saved lives, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer. "Recent reviews of mammography screening have focused media attention on some of the risks of mammography screening, such as callbacks for additional imaging and breast biopsies, downplaying the most impo...
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US Cancer Deaths Have Dropped 27% Over 25 Years

Although cancer is still the second leading cause of death after heart disease for both men and women, its overall lethality has nonetheless diminished steadily and significantly thanks to the progress of research. In its newly released annual report on cancer statistics, the American Cancer Society found that cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 to 2016 by a total of 27%. The authors of the report, published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, note that thi...
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Social Isolation May Increase Risk of Death

According to a study conducted by the American Cancer Society, individuals who are socially isolated have an increased risk of death from all causes, including heart disease and cancer, compared with those who have active social lives. Other risk factors, such as hypertension, inflammation, physical inactivity, and smoking, are also associated with lack of social interaction. The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, suggests that effective interventions could be influential ...
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